Psalm 124:  Broken Snare

Blessed be the Lord, Who has not given us as prey to their teeth. Psalm 124:6

 

Praise for Deliverance from Enemies

 

Psalm 124 is one of four songs of ascent attributed to David (see also Ps. 122; 131; 133).  It recalls and acknowledges God’s protection in the past.  What God has done for us gives us confidence in what He will do for us in the future.

124:1, 2 The Lord who was on our side amplifies the meaning of the divine name of God.  The wording of the Hebrew text is even more dramatic:  “The Lord was for us.”  The priests may have spoken the words let Israel say as encouragement for the people to rehearse aloud their national experience.

1  A Song of Ascents. Of David. “If it had not been the Lord who was on our side,” Let Israel now say– 2  “If it had not been the Lord who was on our side, When men rose up against us,

124:3 swallowed us alive:  The poet describes his enemies first as ravenous beasts, then as raging waters; but God has defeated them all.

3  Then they would have swallowed us alive, When their wrath was kindled against us;

** God will let His own escape the sharp teeth of the evil one.  We’ll all fly away leaving behind our earthly tents.  The evil one can have them.  We are going.  The snare is broken already.   

 

124 1  A Song of Ascents. Of David. “If it had not been the Lord who was on our side,” Let Israel now say– 2  “If it had not been the Lord who was on our side, When men rose up against us, 3  Then they would have swallowed us alive, When their wrath was kindled against us; 4  Then the waters would have overwhelmed us, The stream would have gone over our soul; 5  Then the swollen waters Would have gone over our soul.” 6  Blessed be the Lord, Who has not given us as prey to their teeth. 7  Our soul has escaped as a bird from the snare of the fowlers; The snare is broken, and we have escaped. 8  Our help is in the name of the Lord, Who made heaven and earth.


Mercy (Heb. Channan)
This term is signified as an act of graciousness to someone in need, from a person of superior rank or circumstance.  The writers of wisdom literature frequently commend showing mercy to the needy.  But most of the references to mercy in the Bible have to God as the direct agent of mercy.  The Scripture records God’s mercy being sought on numerous occasions, often using the phrase family from the psalms of lament, “Have mercy on me.”  God shows His graciousness in many ways, including the prevention of harm, the bestowal of family and possessions, and the communication of divine law.

 

SourceRichards’ Complete Bible Handbook by Lawrence O. Richards and NKJV Study Bible by Thomas Nelson

 

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