On Malta

The survivors winter on Malta, a small island some 17 miles long, about 60 miles south of Sicily.    When Paul survives the bite of a poisonous viper and cures many who are ill, the whole company is made welcome.

11 After three months we put out to sea in a ship that had wintered in the island…

Paul in Rome

When the company arrives in Rome, the missionaries are met by Christians living there.  Paul is allowed to rent his own quarters and to live there with a military guard.

17 Three days later he called together the local Jewish leaders. When they had assembled, Paul said to them: “My brothers, although I have done nothing against our people or against the customs of our ancestors, I was arrested in Jerusalem and handed over to the Romans.

23 They arranged to meet Paul on a certain day, and came in even larger numbers to the place where he was staying. He witnessed to them from morning till evening, explaining about the kingdom of God, and from the Law of Moses and from the Prophets he tried to persuade them about Jesus. 24 Some were convinced by what he said, but others would not believe. 25 They disagreed among themselves and began to leave after Paul had made this final statement: “The Holy Spirit spoke the truth to your ancestors when he said through Isaiah the prophet:

26 ” ‘Go to this people and say, “You will be ever hearing but never understanding; you will be ever seeing but never perceiving.”  27 For this people’s heart has become calloused; they hardly hear with their ears, and they have closed their eyes. Otherwise they might see with their eyes, hear with their ears, understand with their hearts and turn, and I would heal them.’

Paul’s Prison Ministry

30 For two whole years Paul stayed there in his own rented house and welcomed all who came to see him.   31 He proclaimed the kingdom of God and taught about the Lord Jesus Christ—with all boldness and without hindrance!

End of Acts

After Acts

Luke’s history of the early church ends here.  While in prison Paul wrote Colossians, Ephesians and Philemon.  Apparently the Jews in Jerusalem did not forward any charges against him.  After the statutory wait established by Roman law, Paul was released in A.D. 63.

For the next few years Paul continued to evangelize, perhaps going to Spain as he had wanted (Rome 15).  Paul wrote letters to Timothy and Titus during this period.

Paul was later rearrested.  He writes his 2nd letter to Timothy during this imprisonment, and it is clear that he expects death.  Paul was executed in Rome around A.D. 68.

But when Paul went to meet his Lord, he left a church which had spread throughout the Roman empire, with hundreds and hundreds of thousands who had come to know Christ through the missionary effort begun by him.

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